A Story from my Travels in India

I want to get paid for writing articles, and so I’ve started putting together some of my stories from travelling to get my skills up to scratch. First up; the time I met a bad man and a good man in Pune, India. You can read the short story here on Medium.

It’s a story of two Indian men I met in the same bar on two different days. One man took advantage of me, making me pay for the drinks without so much as a thank you, while the other man treated me to food, drinks, offered me a job and told me to follow my heart.

Like I say in the story: What a guy!

Visual for ‘Challenge India’ Copy

A while back I created an advertisement for imagined company called ‘Challenge India’, whose business objective is to get travellers to book their daily activities with them. I’ve created the visual to go with it. As you can see I’m a pencils and paper kinda guy. The entire advert is below, and you can see the brief here:

Challenge India

It’s simple: do you want to be free, or don’t you? If you don’t, then you stay where you are right now, looking at this poster. Protected. Safe. Bored.

If you do, you travel to India.

Challenge India won’t appeal to everyone. That would make our Challenge Rituals, well, less challenging. Ride a moped from the beach villages of Goa to the holy elephant in Hampi, climb to the top bunk of a sleeper train headed for Hyderabad, City of Pearls, and haggle prices throughout a country of 1 billion people and 2,000 dialects. Every time you complete a new Ritual, you’ll experience that sense of freedom you’ve never had at home.

Excited? This challenge doesn’t have to wait any longer.

Go to www.challengeindia.com to book a consultation with one of our Indian experts, and feel your freedom begin today.

‘Challenge India’ brief

Here is the speculative advertisement for my own Challenge India brief. In the visual, you see a black and white POV of a person sitting on a moped at the red lights in cold, dreary England, contrasted to the colour POV on a moped in India, dodging a sacred elephant on one side and local Indians shouting their wares.


Challenge India

It’s simple: do you want to be free, or don’t you? If you don’t, then you stay where you are right now, looking at this poster. Protected. Safe. Bored.

If you do, you travel to India.

Challenge India won’t appeal to everyone. That would make our Challenge Rituals, well, less challenging. Ride a moped from the beach villages of Goa to the holy elephant in Hampi, climb to the top bunk of a sleeper train headed for Hyderabad, City of Pearls, and haggle prices throughout a country of 1 billion people and 2,000 dialects. Every time you complete a new Ritual, you’ll experience that sense of freedom you’ve never had at home.

Excited? This challenge doesn’t have to wait any longer.

Go to www.challengeindia.com to book a consultation with one of our Indian experts, and feel your freedom begin today.


Big Ship Copywriting

Communication Brief

Date: 22/08/15

Client: Challenge India

Project: Challenge Rituals

Media: Poster

Background Briefing:Challenge India are a tourist company that want to gain a wider sector of the Indian tourism market. They link travellers up with homestays, hostels and adventure activities. Their Challenge Rituals take advantage of the more free and wild nature of travel in India, compared to the more strictly controlled life of the traveller’s home countries. The Rituals are designed to take westernised people out of their comfort zones and make them feel more free and stronger for the experience. This is not the kind of adventures your parents want you to take. It is going to appeal more to the backpacker traveller than the standard hotel holiday goer.

Compare the difference in lifestyles between home and India. Home is boring by comparison. The makeup of Western civilisation makes people feel sick because it’s against their inner nature. India gives release to that nature.

Problem: This style of travel in India is by no means an easy or particularly safe task

Opportunity: Ignore the wider market and hone in on our niche of travellers and backpackers: demonstrate that the rough, free and slightly dangerous nature of travel in India is exactly the medication travellers need

Business Objective: Get travellers to book their daily activities through Challenge India
Target Audience
Demographic: 18-30 years old, 60/40 male/female, travellers and backpackersPsychographic: Young people who want excitement, danger, to be challenged and have a story to tell. They want to broaden their horizons. They want tol be stronger and tougher because of the experience. They want a sense of freedom,Key Desire: To have more life experiences, more excitement and danger
Key Proposition: In India, you’re free
Reasons to Buy In:

  • Less rules and regulations in India – don’t want to wear a bike helmet in traffic? Then don’t!
  • Learn to interact with human beings again – when you can’t read Hindi signs, you’re going to have to ask a local
  • Thrill, uncertainty and danger – dodge sacred cows on the road, the challenge of haggling for goods, Rickshaw drivers who rush through the crazy traffic
Intended Response: “India looks so much more exciting”

Challenge India – Speculative Brief

Based on my own experience of travelling in India (from Mumbai to Chennai) and comparing it with the life I have settled into again in a westernised country. I think everyone should travel these countries while we can, before (if ever) they become like us. The freedom of just being able to talk to the person next to you on the train, shout with other Indians when the bus driver goes too fast over another pot hole – to just express yourself! A girl I met summed it up as the, ‘freedom not to wear a helmet on a motorbike if you don’t want to’. If you’ve just read that and thought, ‘but that’s not very safe!’, then we’re on two different worlds, my friend.

Big Ship Copywriting

Communication Brief

Date: 22/08/15

Client: Challenge India

Project: Challenge Rituals

Media: Poster

Background Briefing:Challenge India are a tourist company that want to gain a wider sector of the Indian tourism market. They link travellers up with homestays, hostels and adventure activities. Their Challenge Rituals take advantage of the more free and wild nature of travel in India, compared to the more strictly controlled life of the traveller’s home countries. The Rituals are designed to take westernised people out of their comfort zones and make them feel more free and stronger for the experience. This is not the kind of adventures your parents want you to take. It is going to appeal more to the backpacker traveller than the standard hotel holiday goer.

Compare the difference in lifestyles between home and India. Home is boring by comparison. The makeup of Western civilisation makes people feel sick because it’s against their inner nature. India gives release to that nature.

Problem: This style of travel in India is by no means an easy or particularly safe task

Opportunity: Ignore the wider market and hone in on our niche of travellers and backpackers: demonstrate that the rough, free and slightly dangerous nature of travel in India is exactly the medication travellers need

Business Objective: Get travellers to book their daily activities through Challenge India
Target Audience
Demographic: 18-30 years old, 60/40 male/female, travellers and backpackers

Psychographic: Young people who want excitement, danger, to be challenged and have a story to tell. They want to broaden their horizons. They want tol be stronger and tougher because of the experience. They want a sense of freedom,

Key Desire: To have more life experiences, more excitement and danger

Key Proposition: In India, you’re free
Reasons to Buy In:

  • Less rules and regulations in India – don’t want to wear a bike helmet in traffic? Then don’t!
  • Learn to interact with human beings again – when you can’t read Hindi signs, you’re going to have to ask a local
  • Thrill, uncertainty and danger – dodge sacred cows on the road, the challenge of haggling for goods, Rickshaw drivers who rush through the crazy traffic
Intended Response: “India looks so much more exciting”

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